About Pemberton Family History

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Note that on this website the following nomenclature is used: “Family History” is any historical information while “Pemberton Genealogy” is confined to information that is narrowly restricted to pedigree charts, family group information, and other data that describes genealogical linkages.

About Pemberton Family History

This portion of the Pemberton Family World Wide is probably the most enjoyable of all because it contains the things that make life interesting, exciting, and challenging. It also contains stories that are heart breaking, stories of victory and defeat, crime and punishment, joy and sorrow. Those are the things life is made of and they are the things of which this section of the web site are made. It is our wish that every Pemberton may someday find this site and revel in the integrity, honour, fortitude, and tenacity of the Pemberton clan, and that Pemberton youth especially may find here models and heroes by which to pattern their lives as they deal with those critical decisions that all youth are forced to make.

The Family History section of this website is populated by submissions from members of the PFWW. It’s easy to add yours. Join in the fun.

Family History and Genealogy

Genealogy is that part of history that exhibits links between people. One of the major projects of the PFWW is the extraction and publication of this kind of Pemberton Family History. To assist the genealogists in the family, we are publishing this data in an unusual way. We process the data and create a GEDCOM file that then populates the “Extractions Tree” in our genealogy storehouse. The names in the data are tagged with codes that make the nature of the data clear. Here is an example:

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The result of this type of presentation of genealogical data is very exciting. Your author at the moment is also the bloke who wrote the programs to present the data in this fashion. He had been working on his Pemberton line in Cheshire for some time. While checking his programming work, he decided, just out of curiosity, to look for the Pembertons near Nantwich, Cheshire, England, particularly in the village of Stapeley. He did a search for Sarah, a common name in his line, and found several in the parish of Wybunbury. Then he noticed, for the first time (he has been looking at and sorting this data for a full year) a residence named Stapley Cross. He clicked on the little magnifying glass next to the residence and was thrilled to see several Pembertons in that residence, all with Christian names common to his line. 

When you search in the PFWW genealogy storehouse, you must be sure to use these wonderful cross linked search functions to navigate and slice the data in new and revealing ways! For more information on the Extraction Tree, select “Pemberton Genealogy” from the “Genealogy” menu on the left.

Historical Data Quality

Now truth is stranger than fiction, they say, and it is certainly the more exciting and interesting. To that end, the PFWW Historian will do his best to assure that stories, biographies, photos, documents, and any other artifacts published here are truthful, accurate and fairly portrayed. There is also a need for discretion in what things are published. No one wants to read or see something only to regret it.

One of the ways we control quality is by limiting submissions to those who have authority to submit items. This is provided for in the By-Laws where the administrative offices of Author and Publisher are defined. It is not difficult for any member to become an Author. He only has to apply for that privilege with the Secretary or Historian and state what kinds of submissions he wants to make. Submissions by Authors are subject to review by the Secretary or Historian and if found to be undesirable for any reason, the Author will be notified of the difficulty and given opportunity to edit or withdraw the submission.

A Closing Note About You

You are probably one of the people described in the following little essay about family historians. We received this in an entry in the Cheshire Rootsweb forum and share it here. Enjoy this tribute to you.

“We are the chosen. In each family there is one who seems called to find the ancestors. To put flesh on their bones and make them live again. To tell the family story and to feel that somehow they know and approve.

Doing genealogy is not a cold gathering of facts but, instead, breathing life into all who have gone before. We are the story tellers of the tribe. All tribes have one. We have been called, as it were, by our genes. Those who have gone before cry out to us: “Tell our story”. So, we do.

In finding them, we somehow find ourselves. How many graves have I stood before now and cried? I have lost count. How many times have I told the ancestors, “You have a wonderful family; you would be proud of us.” How many times have I walked up to a grave and felt somehow there was love there for me? I cannot say.

It goes beyond just documenting facts. It goes to who am I and why do I do the things I do. It goes to seeing a
cemetery about to be lost forever to weeds and indifference and saying I can’t let this happen. The bones here are bones of my bone and flesh of my flesh. It goes to doing something about it. It goes to pride in what our ancestors were able to accomplish. How they contributed to what we are today. It goes to respecting their hardships and losses, their never giving in or giving up, their resoluteness to go on and build a life for their family. It goes to deep pride that the fathers fought, and some died, to make and keep us a nation. It goes to a deep and immense understanding that they were doing it for us.

It is of equal pride and love that our mothers struggled to give us birth, without them we could not exist, and so we love each one, as far back as we can reach. That we might be born who we are. That we might remember them. So we do. With love and caring and scribing each fact of their existence, because we are they and they are the sum of
who we are.

So, as a scribe called, I tell the story of my family. It is up to that one called in the next generation to answer the call and take my place in the long line of family storytellers. That is why I do my family genealogy, and that is what calls those young and old to step up and restore the memory or greet those who we had never known before.”

Author Unknown.